Conveying Visually & Aural

For my supplemental text I chose “Forty Years later, The Golden Record Goes Vinyl” written by senior associate editor of The Atlantic Marina Koren. This article is interesting because it incorporates three (linguistic, visual, and aural) of the five multimodal modes that have been presented and defined as communication in “What are Multimodal Projects” essay which are linguistic, visual, aural, spatial, and gestural. In The Voyager Golden Record, which was not originally intended for human consumption but 40 years later was. The Golden Record is an audio creation of classical music snippets, nature sounds, and greetings in multiple languages. Koren in the article explains that the record was very limited that even Carl Sagan who led the records production was unable to get a one-keepsake copy. In 1978 Sagan wrote to NASA in regards to getting his hands on a copy and an administrator from NASA responded with a rejection message. The response from NASA was offensive and could have communicated better with the choice of words. Now fast-forward two decades later the Golden Record is now on vinyl and is for sale to the public online for $98. Using the original audio from 1970’s David Perscvitz co-produced he remembers as a little boy hearing of this Voyager launch. In a digital age now Tim Daly teamed up with graphic designer Lawrence Azerrad and they launched a Kickstarter campaign by using the Internet as a platform raised 1.3 million dollars. Shows how these professionals’ have made the unobtainable become obtainable by using the multimodal modes visual, linguistic, and aural.

M, Koren. (2017). “Forty Years Later, the Golden Record Goes Vinyl”. The Atlantic Daily.