The Evolution of Communication

In this educational article “What are Multimodal Projects” by Arola, Sheppard and Ball enlighten readers of multimodal and how multimodality is used in our everyday way of communicate. How writers and or designers convey their message effectively to their particular audience through visual image or text. The New London Group defines the concept of multimodal in five modes of communication: linguistic, visual, aural, gestural and spatial.

Before reading this educational article regarding multimodal I had no inclination of how this has affected and molded our society as a whole. Being a millennial and born in the 90’s we have been granted so many platforms to communicate through such as social media and websites. We are in a digital age where the Internet has taken over with just one click of a button you gain access to virtually anything imaginative. Just like anything and everything in life this can be used for the good and or for the bad like the old saying states “one rotten apple spoils it for the bunch”. When conveying a message you need make sure you use the appropriate language and proper word choice like my mother used to reiterate tell me quite often, “its not what you say; its how you say it” which is a very true statement. Many of these modes that we have been presented in this article coincide in the way the media presents information. Taken into consideration your target audience and what you want to convey whether it is for personal or business the way one interprets your message is extremely important in all aspects of life. You don’t want you image voice and body language to look and sound not convincing when trying to advertise facial products that work miracles for acne.

After taking into consideration the knowledge that I have gained from this article on multimodal and how this will aide me with the evolution of my website and quilt panel depiction. Selecting a website layout that is user friendly as well as a color theme appealing on the eyes is very important. As well as the visual images and word choice knowing my “ target audience” has been a key factor in how and what information I present on my website visually and linguistically.

C, Ball., K, Arola., J, Sheppard. (2014). What are Multimodal Projects. Writer/Designer: A guide to making mulitmodal projects. Bedford/St. Martins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conveying Visually & Aural

For my supplemental text I chose “Forty Years later, The Golden Record Goes Vinyl” written by senior associate editor of The Atlantic Marina Koren. This article is interesting because it incorporates three (linguistic, visual, and aural) of the five multimodal modes that have been presented and defined as communication in “What are Multimodal Projects” essay which are linguistic, visual, aural, spatial, and gestural. In The Voyager Golden Record, which was not originally intended for human consumption but 40 years later was. The Golden Record is an audio creation of classical music snippets, nature sounds, and greetings in multiple languages. Koren in the article explains that the record was very limited that even Carl Sagan who led the records production was unable to get a one-keepsake copy. In 1978 Sagan wrote to NASA in regards to getting his hands on a copy and an administrator from NASA responded with a rejection message. The response from NASA was offensive and could have communicated better with the choice of words. Now fast-forward two decades later the Golden Record is now on vinyl and is for sale to the public online for $98. Using the original audio from 1970’s David Perscvitz co-produced he remembers as a little boy hearing of this Voyager launch. In a digital age now Tim Daly teamed up with graphic designer Lawrence Azerrad and they launched a Kickstarter campaign by using the Internet as a platform raised 1.3 million dollars. Shows how these professionals’ have made the unobtainable become obtainable by using the multimodal modes visual, linguistic, and aural.

M, Koren. (2017). “Forty Years Later, the Golden Record Goes Vinyl”. The Atlantic Daily.